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What to see in Turin: 5 splendid royal palaces

Turin is one of the most popular destinations in Italy. The historic center and its periphery are adorned with magnificent baroque palaces, constructed primarily as hunting and pleasure residences for the Royal Family of Savoia. Let yourself be captivated by the aristocratic life and relive the romantic

Palazzo Reale

The Palazzo Reale (Royal Palace) of Turin is the most important among the residences of the Savoy Family in Piedmont. It is located in the heart of the city centre, adjacent to Piazza Castello. Among its most fascinating rooms are the Salone degli Svizzeri (the Salon of the Swiss), the throne room, the Sala del Caffè (Coffee room) and the 19th century ballroom, one of the more opulent rooms of the Palace.

Palazzo Carignano

Palazzo Carignano is considered to be one of the most beautiful examples of Baroque style in Europe. A visit to the “Appartamento dei principi” (Apartment of the princes) is worth seeing, famous for the splendor of the woodwork and mirrors covering the walls, as is the “Appartamento di Mezzanotte” (Midnight Apartment). The Palace also houses the National Museum of the Italian Unification (Risorgimento).

Palazzina di Caccia di Stupinigi

The Palazzina di Stupinigi is one of Turin’s architectural jewels, located 10 km from Piazza Castello. It was designed as a resting place for hunters and in May 1805, Napoleon lived there before being crowned Emperor. A long driveway, flanked by farms and stables, leads to the main building, surrounded by a 150 000 m² park.

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Venaria Reale

The Venaria Reale, declared a World heritage site by Unesco, is among the top five most visited cultural sites in Italy, and this, since its opening.Do not miss the Galleria Grande (also called Diana), the chapel dedicated to Saint Hubert (the Patron Saint of hunters) and the building called ‘Scuderia grande’ or ‘Orangerie ‘.

Basilica of Superga

The Basilica of Superga is a baroque jeweloverlooking Turin from the hill. It was built by King Vittorio Amedeo II, in recognition to the Virgin Mary for having defeated the French army besieging the city. The panoramic view from the Basilica is quite famous, described by the poet Rousseau as “the most beautiful show that the human eye can see.”